Design for Happiness Deck

Designer: Delft Institute of Positive Design
To design for happiness might sound like a grand and daunting undertaking. However, by use of the Design for Happiness deck one can break the phenomenon of happiness down into manageable components! This tool will help designers and organisations to understand the way products and services can be designed to foster human happiness.
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Designers

The framework behind this deck has been developed by TU Delft researchers of the Delft Institute of Positive Design Pieter Desmet, Anna Pohlmeyer and Jay Yoon. The design and production was carried out by TU Delft alumni Christiaan Kieft and Simon Jimenez.

Process

This card deck is divided in three essential aspects of the Design for Happiness research: Human goals, Virtues and Emotions. For each aspect there are 24 cards that give an overview of the potential manifestations.

Diffuse

Designer: Aidan Wyber

Diffuse coasters all have a unique engraving. This pattern is generated by a custom software that simulates a diffusion reaction. This type of chemical reaction is prevalent in nature and can be seen in the spots on leopards and in the patterns of some fish. The coasters are made from high-grade HPL that is easily cleaned.

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Designer

Stefan van der Heijden: Generative design is something I’ve been doing for a while now and thought it’d be appropriate to use a generative design approach for the Diffuse project. I had the wish of designing a product series that appears a clear cohesive collection, but the individual pieces being very different. 

 

Process

The algorithm that generates the patterns simulates a chemical reaction, in which the concentrations of the reactants vary randomly over the surface. This produces an interesting and unique pattern after every iteration.

 

Productie

Diffuse coaster are all individually engraved in a jig by a computer-controlled lasercutter. This makes for good contrast in colour, but also creates a subtle texture. The edges are finished manually.

Felix

Designer: Stefan van der Heijden
Felix is a standing lamp made from recycled window blinds. The lamp casts a unique shadow due to the helix form. Felix is partially fabricated in a social workplace and can be assembled in a variety of configurations.
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Designer

Stefan van der Heijden: “I want to be the link between design and technology. Elegance can be experienced both in design and engineering.” 

 

Process

Felix is specially designed for the use of recycled window blinds. Ideas were immediately built in prototype form. This physical, iterative phase was not only very effective, it was also great fun.

 

Productie

By considering the qualities of the material as a leading design factor, the lamp is produced in an efficient manner.

Nest (old product)

Designer: Brian Khouw
Nest is a 3D printed tea light holder made from sandstone. The design is inspired by both natural and technological elements. The shape of the product refers to a birds nest and is accomplished by parameters in a 3D cad program.
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Nest---Ontwerper---Brian

Designer

Brian Khouw: “I was inspired to explore new shapes by generative algorithms in Grasshopper. The goal for Nest was to allow parametric design to serve as a form-giving tool.”

 

Nest_process_Brian

Process

The boundary form is inspired by bird nests and how their aesthetics are influenced by different parameters such as local topography and other abiotic factors.

nest_productie_Brian

Production

 Nest has a short production cycle. It is an additive manufacturing product made from sandstone and created by 3D printing binding material in a bed of gypsum-based powder.

Cloudy

Designer: Stefan van der Heijden
Cloudy is a lamp made from recycled window coverings. But within the simplicity of the design lies a special opportunity for the user to customize the product. When the lamp touches hot water the shape of the lamellae will change. The user finishes the product at home, making every Cloudy a unique one.
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Ontwerper---Stefan-van-der-Heijden

Designer

Stefan van der Heijden: “I want to be the link between design and technology. Elegance can be experienced both in design and engineering.”

 

Cloudy_process_Stefan

Process

Stefan strives for appealing designs as result of minimal, principal solutions to engineering problems. Such as Cloudy, which design is derived from material choice. 

Cloudy_productie_Stefan

Production

 Cloudy shows how old materials can find new meaning in a different context. The user finishes the design by forming recycled PVC window coverings in a bucket with hot water.  

Winecooler (old product)

Designer: Debbie Ammerlaan
Centuries of craftsmanship and contemporary design are both reflected in the design of this wine cooler. This unique wine cooler combines contemporary design and centuries of craftsmanship. Debbie used the insulating properties of the ceramic material to create a truly unique wine cooler, which is produced at the famous royal Dutch pottery “de Porceleyne Fles”.
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Ontwerper---L'Offre---Debbie-Ammerlaan

Designer

Debbie Ammerlaan: “The design combines authenticity and technology. The Delft Blue ceramic functions as a thermal isolator to keep the wine cool.” 

Wijnkoeler_process_debbie

Process

The holes in the wine cooler have a positive influence on the thermal properties of the design, since they facilitate a chilled airstream.  

Wijnkoeler_productie_debbie

Production

The Wijnkoeler is traditionally produced at the Porceleyne Fles, the only remaining earthenware factory in Delft, established in the 17th century. 

Waterways

Designer: Barbara Grosse-Hering
The cities of Amsterdam and Delft are both known for their characteristic and beautiful canals. In cooperation with BlueDot and Royal Delft, Barbara combined the distinctive patterns of these waterways with the tradition of Delft Blue pottery in her series of decorative plates. The ‘Waterways’ series was designed for the ‘Delft Tableware Design Competition 2011’, in which it was a nominee.
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Waterwegen---Ontwerper---Barbara

Designer

Barbara Grosse-Hering: “The waterwegen combines two familiar associations of Delft: its typical blue decor of ceramics and the authentic canals.” 

Waterwegen---process---Barbara-

Process

With Adobe Illustrator graphical drawings of the canals of Delft, Amsterdam and Utrecht were created. The set of two decorative plates are modern, yet recognizable designs.  

Waterwegen_productie_Barbara

Production

The Waterwegen are hand painted and traditionally produced at the Porceleyne Fles, the only remaining earthenware factory in Delft, established n the 17th century. 

Hugo Grotius

Designer: Anne de Jongh & Servé Custers
In their design, Servé and Anne have captured the story of Hugo de Groot, the 17th century Dutch jurist and political prisoner. The set is made at the textile museum in Tilburg and consists of a tablecloth which shows his escape route from Loevestein castle and six napkins on which important figures from this adventure are portrayed.
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Tafelkleed---Ontwerper--Anne-de-Jongh-&-Servé-Custers

Designers

Anne & Serve: “The design brings the escape story of Hugo Grotius to the dinner table. The cloths shows the route and the napkins the five characters.”

 

Tafelkleed_process_Anne&Serve

Process

Hugo Grotius is the 2011 winner of the annual design competition of BlueDot. The goals of that year was to design typical Delft tableware.  

Tafelkleed_productie_Anne&Serve

Production

 The set was authentically woven at the Textiellab of the Textiel Museum in Tilburg, which is specialized in the production of unique fabrics. 

Frolic Feather

Designer: Nils Al
The ‘Frolic Feather’ oil lamp by Nils Al is a perfect example of ad hoc design. By using everyday objects to form a new product with a different function, the designer was able to give a new meaning to this combination of recognizable shapes. All together the lamp has a surprisingly cozy effect.
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Ontwerper---Frolic-Feather---Nils

Designer

Nils Al: “I strive towards my final design in a straight line by making my design swear in an early phase of the process.”

 

Frolicfeatger_process_nils

Process

 The main inspiration for Frolic Feather were everyday shapes, familiar for everyone. In a playful way recognizable objects are used to seek new forms.   

Frolicfeatger_productie_nils

Production

 The unique fact about this modern oil lamp is that only the metal wire is custom formed, the rest of the product are purchasing parts. 

L’Offre

Designer: Roel Roskam
The architecture of the Sydney Opera House was the main inspiration for designer Roel Roskam. The result is a minimalistic fruit bowl, which is in balance in multiple positions, depending on the amount of fruit it contains.
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Ontwerper--L'offre--Roel

Designer

Roel Roskam: “I wanted to evoke playful experiences and shapes through my designs. They must look simple and energetic at the same time.

L'Offre--process---Nils

Process

 The composition of the Sidney Opera house was the inspiration for the fruit bowl. The triangulair shapes form a stylish and inviting whole.  

L'Offre--productie--Nils

Production

 Unique for L’Offre is that it is produced from a single material. The metal wires are individually bended in the right shape and welded together.